Changing the conversation on mental health

GETTING OUR HEADS TOGETHER

8 CHARITY PARTNERS

Anna Freud National Centre, Place2Be, Best Beginnings, The Mix logo, Young Minds logo, Contact logo, CALM logo and Mind logos

3 FUNDING PARTNERS

Unilever, Virgin money & Dixons Carphone logos

1. Campaign

THE POWER OF CONVERSATIONS

Conversations about mental health can make a real difference.

Our YouGov survey showed that when people have talked about their mental health they find it helpful.

42% of our total survey sample said that they found talking about their mental health helpful.
83% for people who have actually had a recent conversation about their own mental health.

Talking may be easier than you think but many find it hard to start the conversation.

Difficult: 37%,  Easy: 51%

So Heads Together set out to demonstrate the power of conversations by showing people talking to each other about mental health.

We did this through…

2. Conversations

WHEN WE GET OUR HEADS TOGETHER WE CAN ACHIEVE GREAT THINGS

Building on decades of passionate campaigning by our partners, together we showed that when we got our Heads Together we can get the country talking about mental health.

Here were just some of the memorable moments of the campaign that helped create conversations across the country…
Encouraging men to talk
5.1 million
liked, watched, shared or commented online
Going back to school to talk about how big changes can affect children

Talking mental health on the radio.

The "Global" Takeover reached 52% of British adults in one day.

Social media activity graph:
There was an online conversation on mental health the week of the London Marathon

Graph showing social media activity

3. Marathon

MENTAL HEALTH MARATHON

As the 2017 Virgin Money London Marathon Charity of the Year, Heads Together couldn’t have had a more positive and high profile platform to get the country talking about mental health.

On the day, thousands of runners who were running for many other great causes, wore their Heads Together headband to show their support for the world’s first ever Mental Health Marathon.

Hundreds of thousands of people supported by wearing headbands on social media and even Battersea Power Station put one on in support of the campaign.

40,000
RUNNERS WERE GIVEN HEADBANDS
47,000
HEADBANDS WERE WORN ON TWITTTER
115,000
HEADBANDS WERE WORN ON FACEBOOK
228,000
HEADBANDS WERE WORN ON SNAPCHAT

Charity partner impact

Anna Freud National Centre

42% increase in referrals to parent & child groups

Place2Be

148% increase in downloads of their school resources, with 18,000 downloaded this year

Best Beginnings

104.56% increase in downloads of the Baby Buddy App

The Mix

35% increase in unique under 25 website users during April

Young Minds

15% increase in calls to the parent’s helpline between February - April 2017

Contact

Contact partners Help for Heroes and Walking with the Wounded saw 67% and 63% increases, respectively, in referrals to their mental health support

CALM

Double visits to website after CALMzine interview with Prince Harry and The Duke of Cambridge

Mind

Mind's Infoline had its busiest ever day after the London Marathon, with 58% more calls than normal

4. Impact

A National Conversation on Mental Health

The Royal Foundation wanted to find out how the country was talking about mental health and if this had changed over the course of the campaign.

Half the country is talking about mental health. However men are still less likely to talk than women, and the younger you are, the more likely you are to talk.

Chart showing how half the country is talking about mental health

Talking about mental health is becoming more normal. More people with no reported symptoms of a mental health problem were talking about their own mental health.

There was an increase in men having a conversation with a professional during the campaign period.

February: 23%, May 32%. An increase of 9%

There was an increase in the number of people who said they would be comfortable talking to a family member, friend, GP/doctor, counsellor or charity in the future.

Chart showing the number of people who said they would be comfortable talking to someone in the future

People are most likely to talk to a friend or family member first. They are least likely to speak to their HR department at work.

Chart showing what type of person people are most likely to talk to
Another chart also showing what type of person people are most likely to talk to

The number of people talking about their own mental health increased, peaking the day after the marathon.

I had a conversation about my own mental health

Chart showing the number of people talking about their own mental health

5. Challenges

The conversation on mental health is changing, but there is much more to do.

Our research, which has helped shape our plans for the next stage of Heads Together, highlighted the following changes:

WORKPLACES

Mental health problems are the leading cause of absence from work in the UK, but people are least likely to talk to a supervisor. Encouraging conversations in the workplaces is vital. Mental ill health costs the UK

£35 billion annually

3 in 4
UK suicides are men

MEN

Although more men are talking and getting help, they remain significantly less likely than women to have a conversation or get professional support.

MORE PEOPLE ARE FEELING THE POWER OF CONVERSATIONS

Half the country said they’re not talking about mental health.

Our research shows that even though 4/10 people find it difficult to start a conversation about their own mental health, once they have had the conversation, 8/10 people say they found those conversations helpful.

4/10
people find it difficult to start conversation

8/10
people say they found it helpful

We want to help give more people the confidence, opportunity and tools to start these vital conversations.

6. Next steps

Next steps for Heads Together

Heads Together has been showing people how conversations can help, and now we want to help people have them.

In its next phase, Heads Together will be investing in programmes to help millions of people in the UK’s schools, workplaces and armed services talk about, and get help with their mental health.

The Royal Foundation is investing £2 million to establish a start up for digital mental health innovation to develop digital tools to help people have conversations about mental health.

WHEN WE GET OUR HEADS TOGETHER, WE CAN ACHIEVE GREAT THINGS

Heads Together was enabled by The Julia & Hans Rausing Trust, ShareGift, London Marathon Events, and the first three Heads Together Founding Partners – Dixons Carphone, Unilever UK and Virgin Money.

The campaign has also been generously supported by The Stone Family Foundation, BlackRock, and Patrick Healy.

This support has helped amplify the aims of the campaign as well as fund specific projects designed to help us all with our mental health.